Play Piano Today With Dr. J

Posts Tagged ‘piano skills

So, you are already playing the piano – you have found the joy of investing time and energy into a long-held dream – you have found the joy of sharing your music with others – you have found the joy of starting a project and seeing it through to a beautiful conclusion – you have found the joy of stress reduction and relaxation – you have found the joy of meeting other pianists and sharing your music stories with them – you have found that playing the piano creates joy.

So, now what are you doing to share the joy?   What are you doing to get more people interested in playing the piano? of experiencing the same joy as you have in playing the piano?

I am sure you – like I – have often heard the words “I always wanted to learn to play the piano.”  Well, it is time to spread the joy.  Invite these would-be piano players to your recital.  Make a YouTube video and share it with your would-be pianist friends.  Tell these would- be piano players about “Play Piano Today with Dr. J” and invite them to discover for themselves the total joy in learning to play the piano.

So, what do I learn every week from my piano students?

Perseverance – steady and continued action or belief, usually over a long period and especially despite difficulties or setbacks.  Learning to play the piano as an adult can be a daunting task, yet week after week, I have students who continue to diligently practice to attain technical proficiency in their piano studies.

Patience – the ability to endure waiting or delay without becoming annoyed or upset.  Learning to play the piano as an adult is a slow process and often the technical ability to reproduce the sounds heard in recordings or in the student’s mind is slow in coming.  The patience required to achieve a modicum of success in playing the piano is immense.

Fortitude – strength and endurance in a difficult situation.  Learning to play the piano as an adult is not accomplished by playing at the piano for a few minutes a week.  It requires mastering difficult eye-hand coordination skills which takes an inordinate amount of time at the piano.

Determination – firmness of purpose, will, or intention.  My adult piano students set goals for each series of lessons.  To fulfill those goals and dreams requires a firm resolve to continue practicing and studying even when the desired results are slow to attain.

Are you a successful pianist? Do you have a toolkit of skills, traits, and habits to aid your journey of studying the piano?  Start today to create your personal toolkit filled with self-discipline, technical skills, and reading skills.

A successful pianist has achieved success because of self-discipline.  The successful pianist has learned the importance of regular practice and has learned exactly how to use their practice time efficiently and prudently to achieve a goal.  The self-discipline may come in the form of a practice schedule closely followed day after day or not allowing oneself to attempt pieces beyond their current abilities knowing that with continued self-discipline and goal setting the more difficult piece will be learned at the right time.

The successful pianist has achieved success because of diligently practicing technical exercises.  They know the importance of technical warm-ups and finger dexterity and strengthening exercises and regularly make those part of each practice session.  A successful pianist knows how to work out difficult passages by trying various fingering combinations.  They look for creative ways to move the arms, hands, and fingers to create the desired musical effects.

The successful pianist has achieved success because they have developed music reading skills.  They carefully peruse a piano piece before playing it to make mental notations of key, rhythmic relationships, harmonies, dynamics, and tempo markings.  They develop the trait of looking ahead and of anticipating the flow of the music to and through the cadential points to the conclusion of the music.

The successful pianist has achieved success because they have honed the power of musical analysis.  A piano piece is more than a group of black dots, lines and instructive words on a page.  The successful pianist can hear in their mind the move and flow of the music through harmonic analysis, key and rhythmic relationships, dynamics and tempo.  Before the successful pianist plays an audible note on the piano, they know what sounds they want to create on the piano.

Do you want to get better at your piano playing?  There’s really only one way to get better and enjoy your playing more and more every day and that is to invoke the first “P” word – practice.  If you do something in a concentrated focused fashion on a daily basis, you will get better – and that includes playing the piano.
Once you have achieved success you need to share your new found piano skills and that is the second “P” word – performance.  Share your piano music with your friends, your family, or with the world via YouTube.

The two “P” words – practice and performance – the two important words in the study of the piano.



    • freeonlinemusiclessons: Hey nice blog. I just picked up you RSS FEEDS. Check out my new website, you’ll like it! http://freeonlinemusiclessons.com
    • bhundley1: I'm interested in your elaborating on the "fingering" aspect of practice. Are you a fan of Czerny, for instance, in terms of building up dexterity wi
    • promotionmusic: Thanks for your response. Congratulations to you on the work you are doing in the piano world.

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