Play Piano Today With Dr. J

Posts Tagged ‘adult organ lessons

As we look toward 2015, I encourage you to BUILD ON YOUR SUCCESS! Take a moment to look back on 2014 and re-examine the goals you set and the successes you had. Too often we look only to the future and forget to revel in the joy of goals accomplished and challenges conquered before moving on to the next “big thing”.

I encourage you to look at your past year of organ study and ask yourself two questions:

What did I do well?

What could I have done differently?

Your reflections and answers to those two simple questions will help you move into 2015 with renewed energy and enthusiasm for your organ study.

So what will building on your success of 2014 look like in 2015? Following are just a few of the great ideas I’ve heard in the past week:

enjoying my performances and performing with a smile

improving reading skills

performing organ duets

preparing and performing a solo recital

adding trumpet tunes to my repertoire

reworking old pieces with my improved skills

preparing for college entrance exams

understanding and applying registration skills to my repertoire

planning and preparing repertoire for the Spring recital

So, let the excitement begin!

Dr. Jeannine Jordan has a studio of 18 adult organ students and weekly shares in the excitement of helping these students realize their goals and dreams. She is also a concert organist who performs the multi-media concert experiences, Bach and Sons and From Sea to Shining Sea with her husband David Jordan, media specialist.

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What inspires me? 

My students inspire me to:

  • learn new repertoire
  • play favorite repertoire again
  • analyze my new repertoire to discover hidden harmonic gems
  • explore new soundscapes even in my practice time
  • to creatively teach my congregation new hymns
  • to set goals for planning and performing two new solo concert programs
  • to not be afraid of difficult challenges in repertoire
  • to practice …oh…and practice some more!

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist and instructor of organ and piano

Practice Thoughts

shared by one of my students —

1.  Raise the “priority” of practice.  Make it one of your prime goals instead of getting the time left overs of your day.

2.  Don’t over practice a piece.  When I do I start believing I know it and will then lose concentration.  Go on to another piece and then come back later if you want to play it more.

3.  Have some fun.  Vary the voicing, even to extremes.  Mess with the rhythm and time.  Save a “lollipop” to reward yourself with at the end of your practice session that you can play well that will leave you with a good feeling.

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, teacher and concert organist

Fall is here…

and it’s time to “hunker down”

We’ve had nearly a week of off-and-on rain, wind, showers, rain, wind, a sunbreak, rain, and more rain.  What a perfect week it has been to “hunker down” and enjoy our music room.  Years ago one of my beach students added “hunker down” to my vocabulary.  His thought was that practice sessions are more frequent and more productive during those fall and winter months when the weather gives us good reason to “hunker down” and focus on creating music.  So “hunker down” for some great practice!  ‘Tis the season!

 

Happy practicing!

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist

 

The only way most people recognize their limits is by trespassing on them.
– Tom Morris

How? Asking others, looking around, watching clips on the Internet, exploring a museum, walking in a park, reading a book (eBook or a paper one), using a tablet and third-party software, etc. Open yourself in a big way, look around and pay attention with a focus. Whether sitting with friends, your family, at the office, in nature or elsewhere. Offline or online. Get inspired, let your imagination go wild. There is so much to sense.

Curiosity is the key to creativity.
– Akio Morita

And finally:


Leonard Bernstein;  “to accomplish something, you need to make a plan and have too little time.

The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it.

Just some thoughts for the summer.
Dr. Jeannine Jordan, creator of organ and media events and concert organist

“We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten. Don’t let yourself be lulled into inaction.”- Bill Gates

Moving on is not about never looking back. It’s about taking a glance at yesterday and noticing how much you’ve grown since then.

“Since you are like no other being ever created since the beginning of time you are incomparable.” – Brenda Ueland

Let’s make this summer a time to reflect in order to move on with purpose and a strong sense of where we want to be. What are the musical high points of the past few years? What really worked for you?

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, creator of organ and media events and concert organist

Staying the Course

Staying the Course; as it turns out, it does take Rocket Science. Well, it takes an understanding of some of the same issues the rocket scientists go through.

You may be glad to know that during any given moonshot the space vehicle was perfectly on target about 3% of the time. The rest of the time it was adjusting, correcting, refocusing to get to it’s ultimate target.

 

 

As a musician this is so encouraging.  Are we the only people who have to keep making adjustments in our practice, our rehearsing,

our performances? No, and that is great news. When you are making adjustments and corrections, that in itself isn’t some weakness or lack of ability, it’s just what it takes to reach the target of great playing.

 

Stay the Course!

Dr. Jeannine Jordan, concert organist



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  • bhundley1: I'm interested in your elaborating on the "fingering" aspect of practice. Are you a fan of Czerny, for instance, in terms of building up dexterity wi
  • promotionmusic: Thanks for your response. Congratulations to you on the work you are doing in the piano world.

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